What Really Happens in Steve Reich’s Drumming?

This is a video recording of a workshop presented by Michael Schutz and Nexus at the LIVE Lab at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario on March 6, 2020 titled “What really happens in Steve Reich’s Drumming.” In the workshop, Michael and Russell Hartenberger describe their study that analyzed the first phase in Drumming to determine the relationship of the moving part to the steady part. Russell gives some historical background to the piece and Michael describes the technical aspects of the analysis. Members of Nexus demonstrate phasing on bongos and discuss their thoughts on the process. Additional information on the project can be found in Russell’s article “Anatomy of a Phase” in his book, Performance Practice in the Music of Steve Reich, and at https://maplelab.net/reich/.

Michael Schutz

Michael Schutz

Michael Schutz is currently Associate Professor of Music Cognition/Percussion at McMaster University.  Drawing on his interdisciplinary training in music, psychology, and computer science, he directs the MAPLE Lab researching Music, Acoustics, Perception, and LEarning (www.maplelab.net).  He also conducts the McMaster Percussion Ensemble and serves on faculty at the Honors Music Institute in Pennsylvania.  Designated a "University Scholar" in recognition of his innovative merging of music performance and perception, he has received the Ontario Early Researcher Award as well as numerous grants to support his research.  Michael also received the 2019 Alumni Award from the Penn State School of Music.  He is an artist/endorser for Innovative Percussion and Sabian Cymbals.